Opinion - The Irrawaddy
In Panglong, ‘Union Spirit’ Monument Lies in Chauvinistic Shadow

A towering pagoda dwarfs a monument celebrating the sense of national unity enshrined in the Panglong Agreement, but the story doesn’t end there.

Death of an Activist Reporter

To commemorate World Press Freedom Day, The Irrawaddy looks back at reporter Par Gyi, who was shot dead in military custody late last year.

Note to Washington: Use Your Blacklist Wisely

When the United States removed Win Aung from its blacklist last week, other tycoons surely sent silent prayers that they would be next in line.

With news that prominent tycoon Win Aung has been removed from the US sanctions list, The Irrawaddy looks back at the efforts of other business leaders to rehabilitate their public profiles.

Win Tin: Burma’s Revolutionary Journalist

One year to the day since Burma lost one of its leading intellectual figures, Win Tin, The Irrawaddy looks back on his enduring legacy.

Can Burma Buy Happiness in Washington?

Burmese activists were outraged to learn last week that the government entered into a year-long public relations contract with a Washington-based lobbying firm worth US$840,000.

After 19 Years Behind Bars, Journalist Win Tin’s Fiery Spirit Is Far From Broken

On the anniversary of Win Tin’s death, The Irrawaddy revisits this archived article wherein another former political prisoner, Kay Latt, pays tribute to his resilience.

Win Tin’s Lessons for Burma

One year to the day since Burma lost one of its leading intellectual figures, Win Tin, The Irrawaddy looks back on his enduring legacy.

How One Father’s Letters to the Government Got Him Convicted

Members of Harvard’s International Human Rights Clinic write that shortly after his daughter’s death, Brang Shawng wrote two letters that would eventually be deemed criminal.

Win Tin, Suu Kyi and the Perils of Trust

The late veteran journalist and activist Win Tin was always concerned about the consequences of granting legitimacy to a dubious status quo.

An Uneasy Alliance

Rhetoric around the brotherly bond between Myanmar and China masks recurrent tensions.

While the government relishes its accomplishments, Burma’s ethnic groups must prepare for what will still be a long and thorny path to peace.

The Students Too Deserve an Olive Branch

With this week’s historic peace deal, another gesture toward national reconciliation is in order: the immediate release of students in Burma jailed for peacefully protesting.

The Lady’s Predicament

Aung San Suu Kyi has sacrificed her credibility to court the military and the USDP, with no quid pro quo to show for her compromises.

Burma’s Military Milestone

Far from a cause for celebration, Burma’s 70th Armed Forces Day was a salient reminder of the military’s failure to reform.

Old Laws, Same Military

Recent repression in Myanmar is being directed by the military, which retains control of the laws and institutions it used to dismantle past pro-democracy movements.

Amid a Fragile Peace, Uncertainty and Enduring Scars

Tamalar Paw and Thar Doh are desperate to see peace in their ethnic Karen State—more so, they say, than those tasked with achieving it.

In Thein Sein’s BBC Interview, the Apology That Never Was

With the public still angry over police brutality against students protesting northwest of Rangoon, Burma’s President Thein Sein misses a chance to make amends.

Suu Kyi, Singapore and the Ties That Bind

Singapore’s first prime minister, Lee Kuan Yew, has died. In this 2013 article, Editor-in-Chief Aung Zaw reflects on the enduring ties between Burma and Singapore.

A Shadow of Deceit Hangs Over Info Ministry

A curious shadow sheds light on the ethical moorings of a ministry that makes a point of lecturing Burma’s young press corps on scrupulous journalism.