EDITORIAL - The Irrawaddy Magazine

A harsh sentence handed down to journalists for reporting on an alleged chemical weapons factory serves as a reminder that Burma is still an “enemy of the press.”

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After three years of war, fighting continues and recently distrust between the sides deepened. Both sides should build up trust and resume negotiations in earnest.

President Thein Sein has not shown any indication that he is serious about amendments, but the clock is ticking and we’re tired of waiting.

Burma’s government has created more space for journalists to do their work, but its mindset remains as narrow as ever.

The Irrawaddy condemns the recent imprisonment of a reporter from the Democratic Voice of Burma.

In remarks this week, Burma’s national election commission chairman has indicated that the ruling party of ex-generals will not play fair during the 2015 elections.

There is no good reason for Aung San Suu Kyi to remain aloof from the conflicts wracking the country she hopes to lead.

Until Burma’s government calls the armed forces to heel, the country’s prospects of achieving lasting peace and progress look dim.

After the violent crackdown on peaceful protesters in central Burma many cynics believe we have finally seen the true colors of “reformist” President Thein Sein.

The Obama administration’s decision to take a more nuanced approach to Burma has worked so far, but maintaining the right balance will not be easy.

President Thein Sein sends emissaries to greet former political prisoners who led the 1988 democracy uprising but his own camp rests in the balance.

Aung San’s Legacy Lives On

Suu Kyi pays respect to her late father; and a nation remembers a hero whose spirit continues to guide an unfinished struggle.

Investors should heed Aung San Suu Kyi’s warning to steer clear of the Myanmar Oil and Gas Enterprise until it cleans up its act.

The crowds that greeted Aung San Suu Kyi in Thailand today were very different from those she confronted on this day nine years ago.

The US has suspended sanctions on Burma, calling recent reforms ‘irreversible.’ But for most Burmese, this is still not enough.

Burmese Vice-President Tin Aung Myint Oo is known as a leading government hardliner but rumors abound that the former general has now resigned due to illness.